Six ETFs that track the major indexes

Article Excerpt

Exchange traded funds (ETFs) are set up to mirror the performance of a stock market index or sub-index. They hold a more or less fixed selection of securities that represent the holdings that go into the calculation of the index or sub-index. ETFs trade on stock exchanges, just like stocks. That’s different from mutual funds, which you can only buy at the end of the day at a price that reflects the fund’s value at the close of trading. Prices of ETFs are quoted in newspaper stock tables and online. You pay brokerage commissions to buy and sell them, but their low management fees give them a cost advantage over most mutual funds. As well, shares are only added or removed when the underlying index changes. As a result of this low turnover, you won’t incur the regular capital gains taxes generated by the yearly distributions most conventional mutual funds pay out to unitholders. Below we update our advice on…

You are trying to access subscriber-only content.

To read this article, you may subscribe or sign in.
If you are already a subscriber, log in here.

If you wish to become a subscriber, click here. Or you may enjoy access to all our publications when you become a Member of Pat McKeough's Inner Circle Pro.