Dividend Stocks

Dividend stocks make cash payouts that serve as a way for companies to share the wealth they’ve accumulated.  These payouts are drawn from earnings and cash flow and paid to the shareholders of the company. Typically, these dividends are paid quarterly, although they may be paid annually or even monthly as well.

Dividends can produce as much as a third of your total return over long periods, and you can even retire on dividends.

There are 4 key stock dividend dates that are involved with dividend payments:

1- The Declaration Date is several weeks in advance of a dividend payment—it’s when company’s board of directors sets the amount and timing of the proposed payment.
2- The Payable Date is the date set by the board on which the dividend will actually be paid out to shareholders.
3- The Record Date is for shareholders who hold the stock before the payable date and receive the dividend payment. That date is set any number of weeks before the payable date.
4-The Ex-Dividend Date is two business days before the record date and it’s when the shares begin to trade without their dividend. If you buy stocks one day or more before their ex-dividend date, you will still get the dividend. That’s when a stock is said to trade cum-dividend. If you buy on the ex-dividend date or later, you won’t get the dividend. The ex-dividend date is in place to allow pending stock trades to settle.

We think very highly of stocks that have been paying dividends for five or more years, at TSI Network. Many of these stocks fit in well with our three-part Successful Investor philosophy:

1- Invest mainly in well-established companies;
2- Spread your money out across most if not all of the five main economic sectors (Manufacturing & Industry; Resources & Commodities; Consumer; Finance; and Utilities);
3- Downplay or avoid stocks in the broker/media limelight.

Don’t buy dividend stocks until you read this FREE Special Report,
The Best Canadian Dividend Stocks to Buy: REITS Canada and other Top Canadian Dividend Stocks.

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Dividend Stocks Post Archives

Get a 5.5% yield from H&R REIT

Get a 5.5% yield from H&R REIT

COVID-19 has hurt cash flow at this REIT and forced a distribution cut. However, the current distributions look sustainable. 

In the meantime, the firm continues to work on future developments that should grow future revenue and cash flow. 

H&R REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUST (Toronto symbol HR.UN; www.hr-reit.com)… Read More

Get 3.1% yield from Leon’s Furniture Ltd.

Get 3.1% yield from Leon’s Furniture Ltd.

Improved sales of furniture and appliances led to a 4.9% revenue bump for this company during the most-recent quarter. 

Growing earnings from Internet sales have enabled the firm to raise its payout 14.3% and offer a special dividend. 

LEON’S FURNITURE LTD. (Toronto symbol LNF; www.leons.ca) sells furniture… Read More

Get a 4.7% yield from Emera Inc.

Get a 4.7% yield from Emera Inc.

This utility is now investing heavily in new green-power projects, which should help attract institutional investors targeting companies with high ESG (environmental, social and governance) scores. 

An expanding rate base, a track record of increasing payouts and a sound balance sheet add to the firm’s appeal. 

EMERA… Read More

Get a 5.4% yield from TransAlta Renewables

Get a 5.4% yield from TransAlta Renewables

Higher power generation helped spur this firm’s revenue 6.8% in the most-recent quarter. 

At the same time, clean, renewable power—and the stable cash flow it produces—holds a lot of conceptual appeal for investors. A diverse mix of long-term hydroelectric, wind and solar power contracts will help… Read More

Is a higher dividend yield better? Not Always. Learn how to spot the good from the bad to avoid this costly mistake.

Is a higher dividend yield better?  Not Always. Learn how to spot the good from the bad to avoid this costly mistake.

Investors interested in dividends should only buy the highest-yielding Canadian dividend stocks if they meet these criteria—and don’t have these risk factors
Dividend yield is the percentage you get when you divide a company’s current yearly payment by its share price.

Don’t buy dividend stocks until you read this FREE Special Report,
The Best Canadian Dividend Stocks to Buy: REITS Canada and other Top Canadian Dividend Stocks.

The best of the highest-yielding Canadian… Read More

Get a 4.7% yield from Transcontinental Inc.

Get a 4.7% yield from Transcontinental Inc.

Asset sales and reduced demand because of COVID-19 led to a 19.4% revenue drop for this company during the most-recent quarter. 

However, its ongoing shift to packaging should cut long-term risk and help support the dividend. 

TRANSCONTINENTAL INC. (Toronto symbol TCL.A; www.tctranscontinental.com) is Canada’s leading commercial printer… Read More

Pros and cons of borrowing to invest in dividend stocks

Pros and cons of borrowing to invest in dividend stocks

Borrowing to invest in dividend stocks may be a good decision if you meet these six criteria
Borrowing to invest can make sense for some investors under certain circumstances. We think you’ll benefit most from this buying opportunity by sticking with high-quality stocks. Dividend-paying stocks will… Read More

Get a 4.9% yield from Dream Office REIT

Get a 4.9% yield from Dream Office REIT

Despite COVID-19’s impact on the economy, this REIT’s Toronto properties should continue to attract tenants without the need for deep rent discounts.

The REIT’s recently completed restructuring plan has shifted its focus to more-promising properties in higher value areas. That will also help it maintain its… Read More

How are dividends taxed? The Canadian dividend tax credit

How are dividends taxed? The Canadian dividend tax credit

COVID-19 volatility has highlighted the power of quality dividends. Here’s what you need to know to answer the question, “How are dividends taxed in Canada?”
How are dividends taxed in Canada? Taxpayers who hold Canadian dividend-paying stocks get a tax break. Their dividends can be eligible… Read More

Enjoy a sound 8.2% yield from Pembina Pipeline

Enjoy a sound 8.2% yield from Pembina Pipeline

A high dividend yield can indicate a dividend cut is possible, but this company’s payout looks safe due to secure cash flow from its long-term contracts.

A recent acquisition should also help diversify its operations, add to its earnings and cut its costs.

Don’t buy dividend stocks until you read this FREE Special Report,
The Best Canadian Dividend Stocks to Buy: REITS Canada and other Top Canadian Dividend Stocks.

PEMBINA PIPELINE CORP. (Toronto… Read More